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a century in the making. edith hill cannon grew up in the '60s in mississippi. >> as much as my parents tried to protect me, you couldn't escape discrimination. >> reporter: do you ever forget the discrimination? >> uh-huh. no. >> reporter: she listened to a who's who of celebrities and politicians including the daughters of two presidents, lynda johnson robb and caroline kennedy and two former presidents, jimmy carter and bill clinton. >> this march and that speech changed america. they opened minds, they melted hearts and they moved millions. >> reporter: the event included a recreation of the 1963 march through the streets of washington that ended at the lincoln memorial. setting up a nearly five-hour program under cloudy skies and periodic rain. congressman john lewis returned today, the only speaker here to share the stage in 1963 with dr. king. >> this moment in our history has been a long time coming but a change has come. >> reporter: bill tate says he was here, too, 50 years ago. that day when dr. king made that speech, what were you thinking then? >> i knew we were in a moment
to have anita thompson here, from mississippi, because 48 years ago, there were drive-by shootings at headstart programs in her state, and some toloyers were threatening not send their children to headstart. we have come some way, and we have a ways to go. and earlyeadstart childhood education programs were serving a scant 40% of all eligible children. waiting lists or long. -- were long. rising fixed costs and rent, energy. we have almost always operated at the margins because it seems inconceivably -- inconceivable not to spend every available dollar on providing the best quality program for every possible child. when the unthinkable happened and sequestration became the new reality this march, we had little left to cut. you recently saw -- you have likely seen the recent report that over 57,000 fewer children will be served in head start and early head start next year because of the sequester. this is not a small number. numbercrunching thinkers in our team figured out that 57,000 people would fill a football stadium at the university of louisville. they would fill 1900 school m
was held to honor his dream. ezra brown is a saxophone player from the state of mississippi. he arrived in tokyo on august 28th to commemorate the historic day. the message he brought with him? let freedom ring. ♪ brown played a traditional spiritual song that he has been listening to since his childhood. it's a piece that people in the civil rights movement sang in church to help them during their struggle. >> in the words of dr. martin luther king jr., let's keep in our heart and our mind and our soul about universal peace, equality for everyone, freedom. ♪ >> well, it reminds me that i have to be conscious of the inequalities that does exist now in the world. >> i don't know how much longer it's going to take, if it's going to be another 50 years or what, but we still got a ways to go, you know, and we still got to kind of keep the march going. ♪ >>> a series of bombs have exploded in shia muslim areas in and around the iraqi capital baghdad. the blasts killed at least 40 people. another 160 were wounded. iraqi authorities say insurgents detonated bombs in 14 places including p
she wore for the 1963 march. she remembered the opposite progression in her native mississippi. >> coming no north for the marc, and the federal government on the conditions down south did, in fact, give us th the bear brd base of support. >> crediting the civil rights movement for gay lesbian rights, yet there was the recognition of unmet goals of 19th 63. >> reporter: 50 years later these marchs are repeating the same demands economic and political. jobs and justice. president obama acknowledg acknd progress had stalled. those inequities would have to be tackled in every level of society. >> the successful man who doesn't have to but pays his workers a fair wage and then offers a shot to a man, an ex-con, who may be down on his luck. he's marching. >> reporter: he talked about the politics of division that polarize the government. >> gay rights have been critical of coca-cola sponsorship of the olympics in russia. it accuses coca-cola of supporting hate because of its support of olympics. >> we go to the world's oldest film festival. >> reporter: the high octane glamour of th
rather have a brand new state of the art pipeline traveling down the margin mississippi and on the trunk to be cut tanker cars and trucks. >> host: there was a story that was reported by the newspaper saying that the decision would likely be until the inspector general looked at the investigation of the conflict of interest complete and the inspector general looked at the complete of the environmental research mismanagement that prepares the environmental impact statement on the keystone xl on the central conflict. >> guest: it's not a new story. that came out and was thoroughly investigated. my understanding is that there were no conflicts found. what you are starting to see frankly is the recycling of a lot of defense. keep in mind, that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite the cross border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this environment environmental impact we could have built the empire state building five times buy now. we have completed world war ii in less time. so again as an institutional list a
for the head start association. our office is located is -- our office is located in jackson, mississippi. i've been with head start since 1980 and am excited to be here today to share some of our concerns about sequestration. >> martha coven, associate director for education and community and labor at the office of management and budget which is part of the executive office of the president. so we on behalf of the present over to the budget for the number of federal agencies including education. the ministry for children and families at hhs where the head start progress. >> i'm the director of policy and planning at the office of head start within the department of health and human services and the start of the early childhood career 20 years ago in head start agency in brooklyn. so i'm really happy to be here today. >> i'm sharon parrott from the center on budget and policy priorities were on the vice president's budget policy and economic opportunity. this is the second go-round for me at the center on budget and just prior to returning in november i worked for secretaries and police at t
teenager on vacation in mississippi. is it is a new day, but the day isn't over. the struggle for the civil rights for civil rights, social justice, and economic opportunity to man our engagement and our voice. to realize fully our dream we must raise our voices and take action. we must lift our voices to challenge government and our community and neighbors to be better. we must lift our voices for wages that enable families to take care of themselves, for a health care system that erases disparities, for communities and homes without violence, for clean air and water to protect our environment for future generations, and for a just justice system. we must lift our voice for the value of our boat and have our votes counted without interference. as we stand here today, dr. king would know, and john lewis certainly knows, that today is not just a commemoration or celebration. it is a call to action for the work remains undone in the communities that remain unchanged. our foremothers and forefathers 50 years ago closed the books on the last century. well, when the book closes on the 21st centu
hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king did not mention, about which he later spoke of. that was the district of columbia. that is because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the site of the capitol dome. our city is home to more residents than the state of vermont and wyoming. but we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. we don't even get the final say over how we spend our own locally raised money. we send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy overseas, but don't get to practice it fully here at home. today, as we remember those who gave so much have a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i implore and hope that all of you will stand with me when i say that we must let freedom ring from mount saint alban, where rises the majestic national cathedral. we must let freedom ring from the bridges of anacostia. we must let freedom ring from capitol hill itself, until all of the residents of the very seat of our
songs. ?let freedom ring." from stone mountain of georgia, and every hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king did not mention, about which he later spoke of. that was the district of columbia. that is because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the site of the capitol dome. our city is home to more residents than the state of vermont and wyoming. but we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. we don't even get the final say over how we spend our own locally raised money. we send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy overseas, but don't get to practice it fully here at home. today, as we remember those who gave so much have a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i implore and hope that all of you will stand with me when i say that we must let freedom ring from mount saint alban, where rises the majestic national cathedral. we must let freedom ring from the bridges of anacostia. we must let freedom ring from capi
. in wasn't mississippi. it was not too-- it was a different kind of state. this is punitive. it's vindictive. it's vengeful. it's just a way-- there is no evidence of any voter fraud of anybody using somebody else's identification to vote. if there were, you could say it's an over-reaction. this is a created fabrication to basically discourage, if not make impossible, voting by groups, people who belong to groups who don't ordinarily vote republican, who vote democratic. 56% of the people in north carolina voted on election day. early voting rather. there will be no early voting. it's just an attempt to make it difficult to vote. >> i guess i sort of agree. i would say two things. first, one of the great stories in american history and in the south in the last couple of years, couple of decades, is the gradual empowerment and franchisement of african americans. i think one's basic attitude is you don't want to be on the wrong side of that story. so i do think if you're supporting this, you're putting yourself on the wrong side of that story. having said that, do i think it's a h
on the death list in mississippi and he took it upon himself to train our children what to do in case they heard gunfire. that's exactly what they did that night. each other helped each other to the bathroom to get in the tub and my screams stopped them from completing that hiding point. but we knew, you live with death threats constantly and you adapt your life to that. you might argue, but you don't leave without the embrace. you might become angry with things that are happening around you, but it's a time of support. it's a time of pulling people together. and during that time, we had the ages divided. there were the young people and there were the older people. those in the middle were more or less teachers who were a little afraid to speak up and stand out. medgarr stood alone in that battle. he did have supporters, of course, but he was the point person and it was extremely difficult for us as a family to live with that. but you lived as though every day was going to be your last together. it sounds a little sad but that's the way it was. >> one of your themes in your speech on
secretary of the naacp in mississippi, civil rights leader medgar evers organized voter registration efforts. evers was assassinated in 1963 mere months before the march on washington. since then as a civil rights activist and former executive director of the naacp, his widow myrlie evers williams has carried on his legacy. she joins me sitting rights here, along with joy reid, manager the grio and msnbc contributor. i have been chasing after you, joy. i see you everywhere but here. now i've got you here finally. you are very smart about this stuff. and i know you're from the younger generation. i want to get myrlie on this too. i want you to react to this. a couple of things. it's not just minority voters that benefit from traditional voting patterns. the easier way to vote, younger people have a harder time budgeting their time. they just do for whatever reason. the easier it is to vote, the more are going to vote. african-american voters, many don't have money to have a car, don't have a driver's license, may be older living in row houses like i used to live as a kid, and they basically h
till was found in mississippi. >>> an act of honesty caught on tape in northern new jersey. buddy's small lot was closed when a surveillance video shows four teens entering the store. instead of making off with batteries and ear phones, they leave carbon the counter, including sales tax. >> i think it's terrific that there are still people out there that have moral character not to do the wrong thing and they easily could. >> it seems a malfunctioning door lock is to blame after employees had gone home. the owners went looking for the young men to give them gift certificates, and they found them. four college football players who thank their parents. >> everything pays off. like good parenthoods and being around and showing me the ups and downs of things. you know, they showed me the right way to go. >> great group of guys there. >>> we do have some new photos of the man hunt of alleged boston bomber, dzhokhar tsarnaev. the photos show the sheer amount of manpower called in to find the suspect. the most gripping photos are from the standoff between police and tsarnaev showing him
meaningful progress, we will march through virginia, through mississippi and several other places. do your remember? >> i remember all that. i was donated to the march on washington committee and my task was distributing john's speech, the original speech to member of the press who were seated down below lincoln, still above on the steps. i passed out these copies of john's speech and pointed out to them, that john would be the only speaker speaking that day who talked about black people instead of negroes or colored people as was the fashion. i thought and we thought that this demonstrated how militant we were and how different we were and better and superior we were from the other civil rights organizations. none of the reporters made any objection. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? >> i meant aggressive. nothing harmful or violent. i have always been upset by people who say, they are so militant. they equate it with violence. it is not necessarily equatable with violence. it just means somebody is it aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. we thought we were more militant than
of the -- and i came up from mississippi where i had been working with the student nonviolent coordination committee in the mississippi delta, and i was standing right up there near the lincoln statue where the people are gathered all on the steps then. i guess post 9/11, you can't have them so close, and i remember that the best view was not when i would come down and look up. the best view was when i would look out and see that the march, which had a lot of doubt hanging over it, would people really come, because there had never been a mass march on washington before for any cause. would they come? how would they be received and here, i could not see the end of the people. march by any measure had been a success, more people for any cause had gathered on this space 50 years ago. >> we thank you for taking the time now to help us remember that day 50 years ago and educate many of us who don't remember it, but know of its power in the history books. thanks so much. our live coverage of the march in washington continues next hour. former d.c. mayor, marian berry, will be joining us live. he
the mississippi, in the middle of no place. a lot of these warehouses are in industrial wasteland areas. people commute from nearby cities from all over. the warehouse i was working in had thousands of people in it. since it was the run-up to christmas, they were hiring 4000 additional temporary workers just for the last four months of the year. from the moment i arrived in town, even before i got to the warehouse, i stopped at the local chamber of commerce, and they told me, do not stop crying and do not take what happens to you personally. it is a very ugly scene in their beer there are lots of people who would be willing to take your job because the economy is so bad, so basically put up with what ever they throw at you and leave your dignity at the door. that is what i did and that is what everyone else there did. >> could you talked about what prompted you to get this temporary job, had they become interested in conditions in these types of warehouses? >> i had done another story about the death of the middle class in ohio in the run-up to governor kasich's budget cuts that he was doing, s
some time with senator eastland from mississippi and ted kennedy said dick russell. the fact is, you were within your own party caucus how to deal with people with whom you fundamentally disagree and that -in turn was great preparation -for the larger senate and indeed the larger body politics. that's gone. we now have a rigidly conservative and rigidly liberal party. >> what about you look a lot at -political engent and civic action right. how has that changed and how -does that fit into the kind strife that we're talking about here in washington. table, as they would say in the senate my friends here, my distinguished friends and colleagues. that if we want to make sense of what's happening now the moment to look back to when a lot of these things against change is the 60's and 70's, and this was a moment when many people on the right and on the left looked at what they would have described as the washington establishment and said this isn't responsive enough to the people. and they thought there were a number of ways
. the kids wish network has faced fines before in utah and mississippi. the fines, all those fines added up to a little more than $6,000. >> unbelievable. how that woman sleeps at night and she's there shaking her hand and acting like everything is proper. this kid's wish network, they have been around a long, long time. >> since 1997, and listen to this, this is interesting. it began with a different name. the fulfill the wish foundation, which sounds a lot like make a wish, right, anderson? >> yeah. >> the folks at make a wish actually sued forcing fulfill a wish to change the name. that's how they got to the kids wish network. we found that as quite common, too. the less than forthcoming charities they want names that sound very much like respected charities. >> the bottom line, there are good charities out there. people can go to charity navigator to find out actual ratings of charities. >> you really should. the last thing you should do is have the phone ring and find a tell marketer and telling you what they will do with the money. you should hang up the phone. >> that's how they rais
as a community were off of a very hard fought battle in birmingham, in albany george. >>, in mississippi, in alabama, people were struggling to have the right to citizenship, the right to vote, the right to public accommodations. people were being jailed and this was a culmination of those efforts to come to washington and petition the federal government to intervene and insure that in fact all citizens have equal treatment. >> annie, you were there, too, 50 years ago. again, you were there today for the march today. how did being there in 1963 impact who you became no. >> it changed my life. i was 17, and i had a summer job. i was on my way to college and i realized that there were people all over the country who i was aworking class examined kid of immigrant parents but still had this genetic advantage and needed to go down and say i'm standing with everyone else, because it was so important. i went into college thinking i would be a high school english teacher and i said no, i needed to go into journalism to stand up, bear witness and maybe make a difference. >> martha, you've written
, what happened to emmitt till, august 28th, 1955, that this kid visiting mississippi from chicago was said to have wolf whistled at a 21-year-old white woman, carolyn bryant, then goes back to a shack where he is staying with a distant uncle, great uncle, and three or four days later the woman's husband comes in the night with his stepbrother, drags him out of bed. they spend the entire night beating emmitt till to a pulp, to a pulp, then they take him out, shoot him in the head, then take his bullet ridden beaten body, wrap a cotton gin, throw it in the talahatchie river. how is that the equal of what happened between george zimmerman and trayvon martin? i don't know. but people think somehow with their grievance agenda it is. it lessens the credibility of today's civil rights movement. greg? >> you know what, i didn't need a civil rights movement, i'm just a white guy. maybe there will be one for short white people that smoke, i don't know. it is hard for me to say. i do believe there's kind of a battle for survival in this movement and a movement should police itself. how did
first discovered the following places: florida, the pacific ocean and the mississippi river? do those come to the top -- would you know, jon? jon: two of those, i know. jenna: oh, please. jon, of course. if you're like the rest of us -- [laughter] don't feel bad if you're stumped without using the internet. so were we, quite frankly, and to make it worse, these questions are from a test administered to kentucky schools in 1912 to eighth graders. eighth graders. david strange is the executive director of the bullet county history museum located in shepherdsville, kentucky, and the only thing that made me feel sort of okay is knowing that you, the smart guy at the museum, also had to turn to the internet -- [laughter] to find out some of these answers. how difficult was it? >> well, i remember, i actually remember most all of these questions or similar to them being taught and asked when i was in high school -- jenna: oh, come on, you weren't around in 1912, david, please. [laughter] >> no, but when i was in high school, in the '60s and '70s, i remember being taught them. now, rememberi
klux klan skyrockets, you have the mississippi codes, which began in 1877 and were crystallized in 1901. it deprived blacks of being able to own property. restricts voting rights. for example, in mississippi. and i think in 1871, 97% of african-american men can vote in the state of mississippi. when hayes and's reconstruction, 10 years later, less than 1.5% of african-american men can the.the violence, intimidation, the grandfather's clause, the poll tax. it is really two separate nations where african-americans emboldened by frederick douglass in the north began to really organize and begin to secure the rights while the south have theirs stripped away.>> mike is watching us in honolulu. you are on. go ahead. >> can you hear me? >> yes, thanks. >> it is hawaii standard time. i have a direct relative to my grandmother, of course.her name is jesse hayes. she was born in 1870. in the lower midwest.probably, by blood, long removed. i looked at this beautiful lucy sitting in the chair, looking at the camera with those big eyes, and her beautiful children looking at the camera. obviously,mpr
, mississippi, at "the advocate," a historically african-american newspaper. but "the advocate" had a history of being firebombed, a fact that worried his mother, so that did not last long. mr. jealous was also the executive director of the national newspapers publishers association, which represents african american focused, owned, and operated newspapers. what may have been his biggest advocacy challenge is how he courted his wife and the struggle to keep her and win her over with little money and a new job in d.c. he succeeded, however, and is married to lia, and the couple have two young children. but at the core of what mr. jealous is speaking about today, yesterday marked the 50th anniversary of the 1963 march on washington. five decades since martin luther king spoke, the nation has its first black president, but still has serious issues for the african-american people, including record incarceration, double digit unemployment, ballot box suppression, and youth violence. the killing of trayvon martin brought back racial concerns to the front pages. questions remain if the naacp, like m
to him happened in mississippi in 195 5. he was 14. a lot of people see this film and think about our new cycle stand your ground and stop and frisk and trayvon martin and brings up that talking point is there justice right now? really great part in the film where they talk about, you know, the young seizele gaicecil gain. he is saying the law was against us and not on our side. i think trayvon martin's family and other people would feel that way today. >> "the butler" takes a look at the inner workings at the white house in the past. we know oprah has modern day ties to this white house, the obama administration. listen to this. >> look at all of those administrations compared to obama. i mean, obama will stand alone because of what that represented for the country. i was so pleased that during the process of this interview, a white reporter sitting in the very chair you're sitting in saying he didn't realize until seeing this movie the depth of the importance of obama, but seeing that movie in the context of the civil rights movement, now allows him to see, wow, that is really bigger th
some time with senator eastland fromto mississippi and ted kennedy said dick russell. dithe fact is, you learned within your own party caucus how to deal with people with whom you fundamentally disagreed, and that in turn was great preparation for the larger senate and indeed the larger body politics. th that's gone. we now have a rigidly -conservative and rigidly liberal party. >> what about you look a lot at political engagement and civic actionht. how did that change and how does -does that fit into the kind of -that we're talking about here in washington. we're talking about here in washington. here atable, as they wouldble, as they w say in the senate, my friends here my distinguished friends and colleagues. i think they're absolutely righto make s that we want to make sense of -what's happening now the moment to look back to when a lot of these things against change ise is the 60's and 70's and that was a moment when many people on the right and on the left looked at what they would have described as the washington establ
. the mislabeled products were sold in texas, oklahoma, arkansas, louisiana, and mississippi. that one is hard to believe. >>> okay. our fifth story "outfront," president obama's contradiction, has the president changed his tune on military engagement? here's what he said today to justify a possible strike on syria -- >> part of our obligation as a leader in the world is making sure that when you have a regime that is willing to use weapons that are prohibited by international norms on their own people, including children, that they're held to account. >> okay. compare that to what then senator and soon to be anti-war president barack obama said back in 2006 while touting his opposition to the iraq war -- >> i said then and believe now that saddam hussein was a ruthless dictator who craved weapons of mass destruction but posed no imminent threat to the united states. >> so, what changed the president's perspective? "outfront" tonight democratic congresswoman barbara lee and presidential historian douglas brinkley. thanks to both of you for being with us. today, guys, we saw the administration
south carolina tonight. plenty hot in nashville, for mississippi and vanderbilt. up to 91 in honolulu where hawaii plans to knock off southern california. that was a very well-written weather college football -- >> it was. i feel like i know what's going on in weather and college football now. >> who did that, jack? >> had to be jack. kudos to jack! round of applause. [ applause ] from all of us. >>> while we're on the sports theme, let's go to the u.s. open where venus williams its out! >> she battled and battled again in a marathon match against her opponent from china. went all the way to third set, tiebreaker. williams came up just short. this is the third year in a row, williams exited the singles tournament after two rounds. she's also playing doubles with her sister serena. >> before you think the tournament is totally serious. check out a lighter moment there. check that out. it happened during the women's first round match, briefly delayed by the squirrel. unwanted visitor took its time getting off the court as well. eventually tucked in behind a scoreboard. never to be seen
parts of the mississippi belt. it is about flea increasing literacy rates basically eliminating gender disparity in educational aspects and one fact of the progress is almost completely unappreciated in the last is the way that access to higher education includes a status iranian women. especially that westerners would consider this unacceptable in their own societies and the majority of universities are now female. the majority of them are now female. and women's presence is now felt across many disciplines. notwithstanding, we had this with no direct connection on the ground and a cadre of so-called iran experts, many of whom are ex-patriots were iranian americans will flood the revolution in don't see the islamic public. they continue to misinterpret the iranian politics. telling us that the system is on the verge of collapse. we will continue to lose ground in the middle east. and a good example in 2009 we will have an office of wishful thinking on the green movement that emerged out of this campaign, it is solving america's strategic problem for the middle east. they did so even t
but a few structures of the mississippi river valley and the reoccupied western tennessee. in the east ready lee led his ragtag confederate forces, the army of northern virginia to one victory after another of their opposite number. but the victories were all one on virginia soil. and in feeble, the virginia economy even as they defend it. he knew better than any southerner that the confederacy's resources or to limited to keep fending off the confederacy's enemies in definitely. only by carrying the war into the union states and only by leveraging of war weariness public into peace negotiations can the confederacy hope to win. but this was by no means a far fetched up. in the fall of 1862 dissension over president abraham lincoln's emancipation proclamation had cost unhappy voters in new york and new jersey to install democratic governors they're come a new round of anti-war democratic candidates to were due to run in the fall of 1863 governors' elections in ohio and pennsylvania. if those states also turned against the war they could force of abraham lincoln either to begin peace talks or
, mississippi, marie, democratic caller in mississippi. the future of the democratic arty at this point, hiller -- hillary clinton is the sole standing. who she will take with her, that is questionable. she does not have much of a selection to choose from. after listening to her speech at the bar, it just reminded everyone how skilled she is. she is a lawyer. she understands constitutional law in this country as well as the national law. she's the best qualified in able to skills of being negotiate. it is the travesty of what happened in benghazi that i think it was very unprofessional and very undemocratic how the republican party tried to paint it is a very dangerous thing. some people do not want to have a military state in terms of how they run the embassies. it's very unfortunate that it but that is how the international goes. sabotaging the voting rights act, sabotaging the affordable health care act, making it look like something that it is when it isn't, everyone should be able to have health care. i don't know how many people can remember, but there was a time when you could not he den
, they essentially came the storm troopers of the movement. able to the mississippi delta were other organizations were afraid to go. certainly her. fannie lou hamer after the mississippi delta, sharecropping family, ma who, by her own account, by report went to school only one day, created, in her entire life. i would are used by one of the most eloquent spokespersons for the aims of the movement. a speech that she gave at the democratic national convention in 1964, you can you do it. if you have not heard it, here it. because it is the most eloquent statement that i have heard, courageous woman and is deathly her paper think if we move from a national level to the local level, the list grows and grows. one of, i was the one of the most exciting things about being sort of doing this history, being involved in a scholarly production of literacy about the civil rights movement is about a lot of really good stuff that is coming out that's talked about his local activists, were anonymous for the most part but without them he would not affect a national movement. and i think it was to go back to the p
with teeders ---door key leader us of our allies. make no mistake, president obama believes there mississippi be accountability for those who would use the world's most heinous weapons against the world's most vulnerable people. nothing today is more serious and nothing is receiving more serious scrutiny. thank you. >> i'm trace gallagher in for shepard smith. just heard secretary of said john kerry giving his first accounts of the crisis in syria. the secretary delivers litany of what they believe is the proof
.d. law, so ra mississippi, alabama so there is a signal to take on texas. arthel: thank you very much for that update. jon: turn to egypt where two top islamic groups are reportedly seeking a truce with egypt's military a. cording to the associateded press, the groups are willing to stop massive military tests in exchange to crackdown on muslim brotherhood supporters. joining us to talk about this and the larger issues, chris can and political activist who fled egypt in 2011. good to have you on. >> thank you for having me. jon: this request for a truce from the islamist groups, what do you make of that? >> if that's conditioned by the reinstallment of muhammad morsi, i do not think that this is ever going to happen and i do not think that it would be fair to refer to what these muslim brotherhood gatherings as protests. if we can say that the boston bomber was a protestor, there's much protestors as he was. jon: the coptic christians have bourne the brunt of the rage that's issued by many of the muslim brotherhood supporters. so many of the churches have been burned. what's behind th
by the church in philadelphia, mississippi, a worker from boston was beaten to death. the day of this demonstration we have six people shot in washington the same day. black americans right now, young people, we lose 3000 every six months. we have a 9/11 every six months. over 4000 died in 40 years of lynching. we could lose more than that in one year. the priorities that we have are not racism. just because i say that i need tires for my car, my mother gots heart surgery, we have to establish priorities. because i spend my resources helping my mother does not mean i do not need tires. the challenge we face is we are going to give voice to the least of all its children as a measure of our effectiveness and leadership? [applause] the answers will come by going sufferingommunities of problem, and finding out not from the 70% of the households that are raising children, dropping out, but what is happening in the 30% of the households of the people who are not dropping out of school, in jail, on drugs. we just rolled a young lady in going toin teske, college, and for years she has
thomas, the mother of three from mississippi at the new orleans saints training camp as a referee. >> and she is a member of the league's referee training program in line for an official full-time job. "gma" anchor josh elliott has her story. >> here we go. >> reporter: in the bold black and white stripes and hair tucked under that plaque hat, the official looks exactly like every other one on the field. >> watch your step here, 17. little tight. little tight. >> reporter: 39-year-old sarah thomas, married mother of three is on the verge of history. >> are you a tomboy? >> i am a tomboy, yes. but i am married with two boys. >> reporter: poised to become the first ever full time female official for the national football league. >> where's mama? >> 72, you've got to move up on those pass plays. put your guard up. put your guard up. individually, i am a female. a lot of things set us apart. race, gender, different background. but collectively, we're out there for the same goal. >> reporter: for 15 years, on fir -- officiating grade school, high school, and college games. discovered b
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